21st Century Pagan

The fact that during WWII the British bugged an entire country house where they held the high ranking officers POWs to listen in on their conversations instead of traditional interrogation just confirms every stereotype about the country.

And why the fuck wasn’t that in any of my classes? This is the shit that makes history interesting, not boring dates and impersonal recounting of fact.  

Writing this hockey au is bringing back a LOT of memories, especially about hockey camp.

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icing-on-the-rink:

Source: x
carolathhabsburg:


Cartier turquoise, platinium and diamond tiara. 1935

carolathhabsburg:

Cartier turquoise, platinium and diamond tiara. 1935

(via everbright-mourning)

Book Roundup: Women in Antiquity

yolo-are-avi-atum:

theancientworld:

These are a selection of source books and scholarly works on the fascinating (and often overlooked) subject of women in antiquity:

Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity, by Sarah B. Pomeroy, an essential study of the lives of women in Greece and Rome. “The first treatment to reflect the critical insights of modern feminism.” — Mary Beard

Women in Classical World: Image and Text, by Elaine Fantham, Helene Peet Foley, Natalie Boymel Kampen, Sarah B. Pomeroy, H. A. Shapiro, “The first book on classical women to give equal weight to written texts and artistic representations, it brings together a great wealth of materials—poetry, vase painting, legislation, medical treatises, architecture, religious and funerary art, women’s ornaments, historical epics, political speeches, even ancient coins—to present women in the historical and cultural context of their time.”

The Sacred and the Feminine in Ancient Greece, by Sue Blundell, Margaret Williamson, a collection of essays exploring the intersection between women and religion in Ancient Greece.

Daughters of Isis: Women of Ancient Egypt, by Joyce A. Tyldesley, an extremely readable overview of the lives of women in ancient Egypt.

The Woman and the Lyre: Women Writers and Classical Greece and Rome, by Jane McIntosh Synder, "The pages of Snyder’s text are filled with stirring revelations about women’s achievements."—Susan C. Jarratt, Composition Chronicle

All titles link to the book’s Amazon page.

I’d like to add some more to this, because more information is always better.  All book summaries are from amazon.com.

General reading (ancient Rome and Greece, or both)

  • Pandora’s Daughters: The Role and Status of Women in Greek and Roman Antiquity, by Eva Cantarella  (Author), Maureen B. Fant (Translator). “Expanded and updated for this English-language translation, this book offers the first history of women in ancient Greece and Rome to be written from a legal perspective. Cantarella demonstrates how literary, anecdotal. and judicial sources can and cannot be used to discover that Greek and Roman men thought about women.”
  • Sexuality in Greek and Roman Culture, by Marilyn B. Skinner.  (This book isn’t only about women, but it’s still an excellent resource.)  Non-ideological, its vast scholarship distilled in elegant prose for the general reader, sensible in its judgements, and equipped with a formidable bibliography, this splendid book replaces all earlier works on the subject for those in search of knowledge rather than confirmation of their prejudices.” Times Literary Supplement (Books of the Year)
  • Women’s Life in Greece and Rome: A Source Book in Translation, by Mary R. Lefkowitz. “This highly acclaimed collection provides a unique look into the public and private lives and legal status of Greek and Roman women of all social classes-from wet nurses, prostitutes, and gladiatrixes to poets, musicians, intellectuals, priestesses, and housewives.”
  • Roman Women (Cambridge Introduction to Roman Civilization), by Eve D’Ambra. “While the book is intended to serve as an introduction, it provides detailed and concise information with avenues for more in-depth studies and will make an excellent textbook for any college course on women in Rome.” BMCR”
  • Women in Ancient Greece: A Sourcebook (Continuum Sources in Ancient History), by Bonnie MacLachlan. “This volume is an essential resource supplying a compilation of source material in translation, with suggestions for further reading, a general bibliography, and an index of ancient authors and works. Texts come from literary, rhetorical, philosophical and legal sources, as well as papyri and inscriptions, and each text will be placed into the cultural mosaic to which it belongs.”
  • Matrona Docta: Educated Women in the Roman Elite from Cornelia to Julia Domnaby Emily A. Hemelrijk.  ”Matrona Docta presents a unique study of the education of upper-class women in Roman society in the central period of Roman history, from the second century BC to AD 235.  Emily A. Hemelrijk reconstructs women’s opportunities to acquire an education, the impediments they faced, the level of education they could reach and the judgement on educated women in Roman society.”
  • Spartan Women, by Sarah B. Pomeroy. “This is the first book-length examination of Spartan women, covering over a thousand years in the history of women from both the elite and lower classes. Classicist Sarah B. Pomeroy comprehensively analyzes ancient texts and archaeological evidence to construct the world of these elusive though much noticed females.  Proceeding through the archaic, classical, Hellenistic, and Roman periods, Spartan Women includes discussions of education, family life, reproduction, religion, and athletics.”
  • Contraception and Abortion from the Ancient World to the Renaissance, by John M. Riddle.  ”John Riddle uncovers the obscure history of contraception and abortifacients from ancient Egypt to the seventeenth century with forays into Victorian England—a topic that until now has evaded the pens of able historians.”
  • Great Women of Imperial Rome: Mothers and Wives of the Caesarsby Jasper Burns.  ”Spanning the period from the death of Julius Caesar in 44BC to the third century AD, and with an epilogue surveying empresses of later eras, the author’s compelling biographies reveal their remarkable contributions towards the legacy of Imperial Rome.”

About Clodia Metellī specifically:

  • Clodia: A Sourcebook, by Julia Dyson Hejduk.  ”Noble and notorious, the flamboyant Clodia Metelli was the object of passion in poetry and prose in ancient Rome and appears in more written sources than any other woman of her day. Cicero, in a famous oration, branded her a whore yet in private correspondence mentions seeking her help. Her stormy affair with the poet Catullus—the Western world’s first recorded romance with a real and richly characterized woman—had a profound influence on erotic literature.”

About the Twelfth Century Renaissance specifically:

  • Women of the Twelfth Century, Volume 1: Eleanor of Aquitaine and Six Others, by Georges Duby.  ”In this volume, Georges Duby examines the lives of prominent twelfth-century French women as well as popular female literary figures of that time. Focusing on medieval notions of women and love, Duby looks for the ideological motivations for the representation of the female sex. He analyzes the ways in which women’s biographies were written and how female characters were treated in fable and legend, pointing to the social and political forces at work in these representations.”

Specific groups in academia:

  • The Women’s Classical CaucusInaugurated in 1992 with an event hosted by the University of Cincinnati…these quadrennial scholarly gatherings are frequently also the venue where tensions emerging from the intersection of feminism and classical studies are first recognized, formulated, and debated.”

(via tygermama)

theorlandojones:

This is a very serious disease* so I gladly accept the “bucket challenge”

*My heart goes out to all those who struggle with ALS but I am, of course, talking about the disease of apathy.  If (and hopefully when) Michael Brown’s killer is brought to justice and convicted of 1st degree murder, it still won’t prevent this from happening again. We cannot accept this as the status quo. We MUST continue the fight at the ballot box, in the media and by working to create systemic change. I’m not naive to the dirty politics (redistricting, voter ID requirements, etc) that will try to prevent us from our goal. But I refuse to give up hope. My “bullet bucket challenge” is not about pointing fingers and it’s not about being angry. Every shell casing in that bucket represents the life of someone who fought and died in the goal for civil rights and human dignity. As a member of law enforcement (yes I really am a reserve sheriff) I will not stand idly by while others violate civil and human rights under the cover of authority and I will insist that other good cops rise to the same standard as well. As a black man I will demand more from myself and my community. I will not allow outsiders to co-opt our struggle in order to commit violence in our name. I’m channeling my outrage into action so I no longer feel powerless. It’s not about black or white. It’s not about rich or poor. It’s about us vs. them. There are more of us — from all races, genders and identities — then there will ever be of them. And we will be victorious.

"The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of great moral crisis, maintain their neutrality"

Join me.

showslow:

Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema (8 January 1836 – 25 June 1912) was a Dutch painter of special British denizenship.

Born in Dronrijp, the Netherlands, and trained at the Royal Academy of Antwerp, Belgium, he settled in England in 1870 and spent the rest of his life there. A classical-subject painter, he became famous for his depictions of the luxury and decadence of the Roman Empire, with languorous figures set in fabulous marbled interiors or against a backdrop of dazzling blue Mediterranean Sea and sky.

Though admired during his lifetime for his draftsmanship and depictions of Classical antiquity, his work fell into disrepute after his death, and only since the 1960s has it been re-evaluated for its importance within nineteenth-century English art.

(via amandalouisejm)

guiltyhipster:

Girls get mocked for liking high heels and lipstick. Girls get mocked for liking sports. Girls get mocked for liking tea and books. Girls get mocked for liking comics books and video games. Girls get mocked for liking math and science. Girls get mocked for liking boys. Girls get mocked for liking girls. Girls get mocked for liking both. What the fuck are we supposed to like? Water? Air? Come on, tell me. I’m dying to know. 

(via purritt2b)

meorzo:

Here comes one of my favourite parts of the year - August and September. Fully bloomed all around and it’s almost time to harvest… I spend lots of time in the woods and travelling those months, but never forget to get together my friends here, in my little cabin in the woods.

(via lov3ly-moon)

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
Evelyn de Morgan’s paintings usually indicate their blatant symbolism by their (subtly or unsubtly) implausible settings.
In The Crown of Glory, though—which de Morgan painted in 1896—the scene, though obviously invented, doesn’t have the same immediate feeling of impossibility.
Certainly it isn’t a precise depiction of the classical world: de Morgan has no interest in the careful historicity of Alma-Tadema. The fish at the edge of the tapestry or fresco behind her evoke both her husband’s ceramic tiles and the ancient Roman motifs that inspired him. The little telamon and caryatid that support the bookshelf again suggest the classical world, while the raised-cord-bound books on them are clearly of more modern origin. The three-legged table with its climbing snakes, and the subject’s own draped and gathered garments, both straddle that same line between a modern and a classical aesthetic. For the most part, though, the work looks at least internally consistent.
But perhaps the most important element—the large image towards which the subject looks as she casts off her ornaments—is a total break from even the fairly modernized Greco-Roman style of the rest of the scene.
After all, it is practically a copy of one of Giotto’s 14th-century frescoes for the Lower Basilica in Assisi, which (as Christie’s points out), de Morgan “may well have seen…on one of her numerous visits to Italy, or she may have known the design in reproduction, possibly the engraving in William Young Ottley’s Florentine School (1826) which her mentor Burne-Jones had copied in an early sketchbook (Victoria and Albert Museum).”
The result is to produce a sort of dissonance between the ornate, finely wrought Greco-Roman objects in the rest of the scene, and the incredibly simplified—even flattened—Medieval depiction of Saint Francis’ allegorical marriage to Lady Poverty.
Which is, of course, the visual equivalent of the spiritual dissonance which is suddenly brought to the attention of the painting’s subject.

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

Evelyn de Morgan’s paintings usually indicate their blatant symbolism by their (subtly or unsubtly) implausible settings.

In The Crown of Glory, though—which de Morgan painted in 1896—the scene, though obviously invented, doesn’t have the same immediate feeling of impossibility.

Certainly it isn’t a precise depiction of the classical world: de Morgan has no interest in the careful historicity of Alma-Tadema. The fish at the edge of the tapestry or fresco behind her evoke both her husband’s ceramic tiles and the ancient Roman motifs that inspired him. The little telamon and caryatid that support the bookshelf again suggest the classical world, while the raised-cord-bound books on them are clearly of more modern origin. The three-legged table with its climbing snakes, and the subject’s own draped and gathered garments, both straddle that same line between a modern and a classical aesthetic. For the most part, though, the work looks at least internally consistent.

But perhaps the most important element—the large image towards which the subject looks as she casts off her ornaments—is a total break from even the fairly modernized Greco-Roman style of the rest of the scene.

After all, it is practically a copy of one of Giotto’s 14th-century frescoes for the Lower Basilica in Assisi, which (as Christie’s points out), de Morgan “may well have seen…on one of her numerous visits to Italy, or she may have known the design in reproduction, possibly the engraving in William Young Ottley’s Florentine School (1826) which her mentor Burne-Jones had copied in an early sketchbook (Victoria and Albert Museum).”

The result is to produce a sort of dissonance between the ornate, finely wrought Greco-Roman objects in the rest of the scene, and the incredibly simplified—even flattened—Medieval depiction of Saint Francis’ allegorical marriage to Lady Poverty.

Which is, of course, the visual equivalent of the spiritual dissonance which is suddenly brought to the attention of the painting’s subject.

(via tygermama)